sweaterkittensahoy:

unamusedsloth:

Comic strip artists from the 40’s draw their characters while blindfolded

I love this. It looks like someone combined abstract art with comic art for a final project.

This is so great.

cephiedvariable:

thebeccabeast:

coelasquid:

captainglazak:

The things this man has heard.

I love Raiden.

I love Kojima.

I love Shinkawa.

His face in the last picture.

He’s never kidding, you fool.

"Again I thought he was kidding, but I soon realized that Mr. Kojima was serious."

(Source: jordanong)

libutron:

Large-leaf Grass of Parnassus - Parnassia grandifolia
Despite its common name, Parnassia grandifolia (Celastrales - Celastraceae) is not a grass, but a perennial herb, forming clusters of slightly succulent, shiny leaves. Its large, white flowers with green veins and bright orange anthers are really beautiful.
Parnassia grandifolia is native to central and south eastern US. It grows in alkaline seeps and is an indicator of rich, old forest. 
References: [1]
Photo credit: ©Alan Cressler | Locality: Ocala National Forest, Marion Co., Florida, US (2010)

libutron:

Large-leaf Grass of Parnassus - Parnassia grandifolia

Despite its common name, Parnassia grandifolia (Celastrales - Celastraceae) is not a grass, but a perennial herb, forming clusters of slightly succulent, shiny leaves. Its large, white flowers with green veins and bright orange anthers are really beautiful.

Parnassia grandifolia is native to central and south eastern US. It grows in alkaline seeps and is an indicator of rich, old forest. 

References: [1]

Photo credit: ©Alan Cressler | Locality: Ocala National Forest, Marion Co., Florida, US (2010)

(via science-junkie)

otherbully1:

the-milk-eyed-monster:

colony-drop:

oh look my favorite photo set

cool

what the entire and actual existing fuck?

(Source: springbeanz, via cephiedvariable)

madlori:

explore-blog:

Measles has surged back in Europe, while whooping cough is has become a problem here in the U.S.

Childhood immunization rates plummeted in parts of Europe and the U.K. after a 1998 study falsely claimed that the vaccine for measles, mumps and rubella was linked to autism.

That study has since been found to be fraudulent. But fears about vaccine safety have stuck around in Europe and here in the U.S.

NPR maps the resurgence of preventable diseases due to public ignorance and lamentable misinformation about vaccines.

Pair with Bill Gates on vaccines, animated.

Andrew Wakefield has so much fucking blood on his hands, it’s unbelievable.

(Source: explore-blog, via ink-phoenix)

wapiti3:

Select genera and species of fish, which in the years 1817, 1820 order and march through Brazil auspices of Maximilian Joseph, 1 on Flickr.

By Spix, Johann Baptist von, 1781-1826 
Agassiz, Louis, 1807-1873 
Martius, Karl Friedrich Philipp von, 1794-1868,ht
Publication info Monachii [München] :Typis C. Wolf,1829-[31]
BHL Collections:
Ernst Mayr Library of the MCZ, Harvard University

(via scientificillustration)

naamahdarling:

howtonotsuckatgamedesign:

mirrepp:

Some harsh but very very true words

When people let me review their portfolios (on career day or open days at my game design school) I explicitly ban them from commenting during the review… …because otherwise they will follow the impulse to downplay everything I see in an attempt at being humble."this is an old image…"
"I’m not happy with that one…""this is just a sketch…"
"I did this really quickly…""there is better stuff on later pages…"It’s totally understandable to have those impulses. The quality of art is not empirical data and therefore impossible to measure. Good art, bad art, it all comes down to standards. And you don’t want to come off as naive or self-absorbed.But just don’t do it. Don’t talk yourself down in front of others. In the best case you have someone supportive who now thinks “damn, this person needs to be prepped up all the time. Do I really want to work with somebody like that” or in worst case “now that you say it, yeah, this is kinda lame/rushed/unfinished/lazy, go away.”You can only submit what you have. If that is not enough, then it’s not enough. Your attitude will not change that. But if it is enough, you can do serious harm by not being confident of who you are now.This means appreciating what you are able to do right now and have a clear vision of what you want to learn, be confident that you will learn it in time. Be proud.

This is really important.  Eliminate this urge.  Eliminate it professionally, when having contact with people in a position to buy your work.  Eliminate it socially, when you just share your work for fun.  Destroy this urge as thoroughly as you possibly can.
Because when you have done that, you’ll find that you feel at least 25% less shitty about your own work.  You lose the urge to do it.  You stop reinforcing those negative thoughts, and they retreat.  They may never go away completely (although they might!) but this is good practice for ignoring those thoughts flat-out.
Don’t shit-talk yourself.  Even if you can’t be SO PROUD, don’t ever try to influence anyone’s opinion toward your work in the negative.
Try to love your work.  Try to see what you learned from each piece, even if it’s a failure.  If you feel that you learned nothing, appreciate the fact that just spending time on it is honing your skills and giving you valuable practice.
i used to be super not-confident in my own work.  When I stopped pointing out the flaws in my own stuff, I felt better about it almost immediately.

naamahdarling:

howtonotsuckatgamedesign:

mirrepp:

Some harsh but very very true words

When people let me review their portfolios (on career day or open days at my game design school) I explicitly ban them from commenting during the review… …because otherwise they will follow the impulse to downplay everything I see in an attempt at being humble.

"this is an old image…"

"I’m not happy with that one…"

"this is just a sketch…"

"I did this really quickly…"

"there is better stuff on later pages…"

It’s totally understandable to have those impulses. The quality of art is not empirical data and therefore impossible to measure. Good art, bad art, it all comes down to standards. And you don’t want to come off as naive or self-absorbed.

But just don’t do it. Don’t talk yourself down in front of others. In the best case you have someone supportive who now thinks “damn, this person needs to be prepped up all the time. Do I really want to work with somebody like that” or in worst case “now that you say it, yeah, this is kinda lame/rushed/unfinished/lazy, go away.”

You can only submit what you have. If that is not enough, then it’s not enough. Your attitude will not change that. But if it is enough, you can do serious harm by not being confident of who you are now.

This means appreciating what you are able to do right now and have a clear vision of what you want to learn, be confident that you will learn it in time. 

Be proud.




This is really important.  Eliminate this urge.  Eliminate it professionally, when having contact with people in a position to buy your work.  Eliminate it socially, when you just share your work for fun.  Destroy this urge as thoroughly as you possibly can.

Because when you have done that, you’ll find that you feel at least 25% less shitty about your own work.  You lose the urge to do it.  You stop reinforcing those negative thoughts, and they retreat.  They may never go away completely (although they might!) but this is good practice for ignoring those thoughts flat-out.

Don’t shit-talk yourself.  Even if you can’t be SO PROUD, don’t ever try to influence anyone’s opinion toward your work in the negative.

Try to love your work.  Try to see what you learned from each piece, even if it’s a failure.  If you feel that you learned nothing, appreciate the fact that just spending time on it is honing your skills and giving you valuable practice.

i used to be super not-confident in my own work.  When I stopped pointing out the flaws in my own stuff, I felt better about it almost immediately.

(via mercurialmalcontent)